Daily Archives: April 29, 2013

Notes From The Field/ #330

White-faced Ibis! The same bird I missed last year by hours. Arriving home from my yearly Lake Erie Warbler Madness Adventure, I receive a call from birding buddy Allan who asked if I happened to see the White-faced Ibis at Metzger Marsh? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

So when rumors of dark Ibis’s at Fernald Preserve a few days ago, I waited till something concrete came about. And it did yesterday. 2 White-faced Ibis’s were spotted and then I got that same old feeling. “The Twitch” I made a hasty phone call to Allan (who’s retired)  and ask if he was heading over in the morning. And if he was would he let me know if the birds were still there.

So at 9:30 this morning a post came across the internet of our White-faced Ibis being seen. Now the waiting game starts. So I waited, and waited, and waited till they sprang me from work.

With just having received a speeding ticket last week I showed great restraint as I drove over to Fernald this afternoon. Following the speed limit ever so closely I made quite good time, and arrived as a few fellow birders were focusing in on the birds.

Did I say I love getting a new life bird.

IMG_2528Lighting was horrendous. It was really overcast and the shadows made getting the true color of the birds difficult. I shot over 60 pictures.

IMG_2546The Glossy Ibis has a brownish bill, this White-faced Ibis has a gray one.

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The Passenger Pigeon

As most everyone knows the last Passenger Pigeon died at the Cincinnati Zoo on September 1st, 1914. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of this extinct species local wildlife artist John Ruthven has painted a beautiful portrait of “Martha”, the last Passenger Pigeon.

However there is more to this picture than just “Martha”. As you will see in the next piture, “Martha” is leading a massive flock of Passenger Pigeons as they fly over the avian houses that once stood at the Cincinnati Zoo. The only one left is the one where “Martha” was housed.

That’s the artist himself, 88 year old John Ruthven, whom many consider the modern day Audubon.

And when the mural is completed it will look like this. The building, which is lucky enough to have it painted on it’s side, is located at 8th and Vine St. in downtown Cincinnati. The date of the mural’s dedication is yet to be announced, but it will be in the month of September.

I may not be there for the official, but I will visit this site to check out this beautiful mural.